#NaNoWriMo Getting word count when you’ve fallen behind #amwriting

For some NaNoWriMo novelists, falling slightly behind becomes a death knell to their project. They feel there is no way they can make it up, that they are doomed, and therefore they quit.

In my experience, falling behind on your word count is the easiest problem to fix.

First, don’t let self-doubt creep in. This is human nature, but don’t let it defeat you.

Second, you must buckle down and write more than the minimum for a while. That is also hard, but if you catch it early, you can do it.

Do a little math. Figure out how many words per day you will need to write to make up what you missed. Add that number to your daily word goals. You might want to add a hundred or so words to that number, so you have a little wiggle-room.

Remember, what you are writing is a rough draft, so your story arc is going to be bumpy and uneven. It doesn’t have to be perfect so don’t fuss over making so. The goal of NaNoWriMo is to get that rough draft written in thirty days. So, every time you have fifteen minutes to spare, sit down and write as much as you can in that short time period. Spew your story as fast as you can in those moments before you are pulled away. With six or seven short bursts of writing, you can really rack up the word count, and perhaps make up the difference there.

We all must eat, so during NaNoWriMo, I am the queen of the crockpot and anything that can be baked in the oven. Think about it—once the food is in the oven, you will have at least half an hour of downtime. Set your laptop on the counter and write while things are baking/nuking. That is how I cook Thanksgiving dinner for my extended family—I start prepping food on Tuesday, and by writing every time I have a ten or fifteen minute pause in the preparations, I don’t fall behind. This also allows me to enjoy my family on Thanksgiving day, because most of the work is already done.

Yes, the vegan does roast 2 turkeys for the numerous carnivores, but everything else is plant based and homemade. Despite the extra work that Thanksgiving week adds to my life, I get my word count every day and still get my house ready for guests by using this method.

For much of my working life, I was a single parent, sometimes with three part-time jobs. My main job was as a bookkeeper, or working in data entry for corporate America, but though the 1990s I worked weekends and holidays as a hotel maid. I’m retired now, but although I’d never heard of NaNoWriMo, I was a secret novelist, and I couldn’t stop thinking about what I was writing.

What I did in those old days was this—I always took my lunch to work and wrote during my lunch half-hour. You don’t have to announce you are writing a book if you don’t wish to—I certainly didn’t feel comfortable doing so. If you want to spend your lunch time writing, politely let people know you’re handling personal business and won’t have time to chat.

Some offices will allow you to use your workstation computer for personal business, but most of my places of employment frowned on that. I brought a notebook and pen as I didn’t own a good laptop. By writing down all my thoughts and ideas, I had a great start when I finally did get a chance to write. If your work allows, bring your laptop or your iPad/Android. So you don’t get into trouble with the boss, sit in the lunchroom (if you have one).

I always wrote in the evenings while my children did their homework, which sometimes meant a lot of stopping and starting, but I did get some writing done. Some is better than none! You can also set aside a block of time on the weekend to make up some words, though that can be difficult, as setting aside an un-infringeable time on a weekend can become a hardship, especially if you have a young family.

But by writing in short bursts whenever you have the opportunity, you might get your first draft finished, and get that certificate that says you completed 50,000 words in 30 days.

One way to cultivate your emotional and poetic mind, and to improve your writing skills in general, is to write in the stream-of-consciousness style. This is unstructured, unedited writing. It reflects your (or your character’s) observations. Writing in this fashion mirrors the way internal thoughts in the human mind work – you are quickly processing thoughts and perhaps switching from one topic to another with a certain amount of abandon. Just go for it.

Remember what I said above? Don’t worry about perfection. The purpose of NaNoWriMo is to get that rough draft written in thirty days. In January or March, or whenever you go to rewrite your rough draft, you might be amazed to find that much of what you originally wrote has life and passion.

The point is to keep on writing even when you have fallen behind. Use whatever motivational tricks you need to encourage yourself, and don’t be too hard on yourself. Far more importantly than simply getting word count, the goal is to finish your novel.

And remember: you can do it.

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12 Comments

Filed under NaNoWriMo, writing

12 responses to “#NaNoWriMo Getting word count when you’ve fallen behind #amwriting

  1. Stephen Swartz

    Coffee, as much as I can hold,
    And pizza by the round
    Is what I need, whether hot or cold,
    To get those words down!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Reblogged this on Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog and commented:
    Great Advice from Connie 😎

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Some NaNos also get a lot of velocity out of the constraint of timed sprints with other writers . . . the inner editor gets left in the dust. Thanks for the read.

    Like

    • We do a lot of timed sprints at write ins and through my regional group, and yes they are excellent for forcing out the words. I like the NaNoWriMo Wordsprint App:https://nanowrimo.org/word_sprints/22352

      We get a lot done that way. In a way, short bursts in the home environment are like sprints, except they’re chancier–they have the chance of going on longer than expected, but also the chance of being cut short. Perhaps the air of danger is what forces me to crank out the words in these sprints, lol! Thank you for stopping by!

      Like

  4. I keep seeing this NaNoWriMo.. Is this a blog or a site or?? I wish I could be as disciplined!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hello! So nice to meet you. NaNoWriMo is short for National Novel Writing Month. NaNoWriMo.org describes themselves as “A fun, seat-of-your-pants approach to creative writing. On November 1, participants begin working towards the goal of writing a 50,000-word novel by 11:59 PM on November 30.” I have participated (and achieved my word count) for the last seven years, and have been a Municipal Liaison for six. As a non-profit organization, NaNoWriMo supports young writers programs on a national level, and is a driving force in the campaign to bring literacy to all levels of society. You can find out more by going out to http://www.nanowrimo.org and seeing what they do.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. This is good advice for anyone working on a first draft, even if they aren’t doing Nano. Forge ahead and get to the end!

    Liked by 1 person

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